VA announced that it recently established a partnership with the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) to promote and support Veterans by providing new physical therapy resources.

The partnership coordinates strengths of both organizations to benefit all Veterans and their families, physical therapists and physical therapist assistants by helping to raise awareness of physical therapy and create new employment and practice opportunities.

“Physical therapy is an important resource for improving Veterans’ health and well-being,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “This new agreement allows both organizations to develop additional best practices in treatment of Veterans in both the federal and private sector. We look forward to the positive outcomes of this partnership.”

The agreement will use VA and APTA resources to promote nonpharmacological treatment options for pain, VA’s suicide prevention efforts, utilization of VA’s Adaptive Sports Grants Program and physical therapists’ participation in VA’s National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Events.

VA employs over 3,500 physical therapists and physical therapist assistants, and offers the largest physical therapy residency program in the nation.

APTA represents more than 100,000 physical therapists, physical therapists assistants and students of physical therapy nationwide. Its mission is to advance the profession of physical therapy and to improve the health of society.

For more information visit: www.va.gov or https://www.apta.org/.

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Published on Dec. 28, 2018

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