A holistic approach to patient care has gained traction with Veterans as a complement to medication. With treatments like acupuncture, yoga, tai chi, meditation and chiropractic care, it’s no wonder so many are choosing Whole Health.

“Some people see these practices as non-traditional,” said Dr. Christina Vair, Whole Health director for Salisbury VA. “However, yoga and tai chi have been around thousands of years. It’s just not something we’ve incorporated into western health care.”

One therapy, which has been around since the 18th century, is clinical hypnosis.

“Hypnosis is a tool that has been used for many years within VA,” said Vair. “Data suggests that about 70 percent or more of the population is hypnotizable.”

Some folks respond quickly and deeply to hypnosis, while some are not quite as responsive. When many people think of hypnosis they imagine a Las Vegas show with someone clucking like a chicken.

“For entertainment purposes, people are in some state of being controlled,” said Vair. “Those sorts of performances are not an accurate representation of how we use hypnosis in the clinical setting. That’s not what real hypnosis is.”

Veteran’s hobbies can be trance based

In the clinical environment, providers focus more on trance, or focused attention. Many people go into a trance on a regular basis – like driving a car while being on mental autopilot, with the mind somewhere else.

“I hope this gets other Veterans interested.”

“A lot of our Veterans have hobbies that are trance based,” said Vair. “Woodworkers, artists and musicians can get so engaged in an activity that they look down at the clock and see several hours have passed. They didn’t realize it because they were so engaged in what they were doing… that’s trance.”

Vair was exposed to hypnosis 11 years ago. She trained with the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis as well as VA’s national training program. VISN 6 was the first network to hold a regional training in clinical hypnosis.

Research has shown hypnosis to be effective for chronic pain, post-traumatic stress, depression and anxiety, as well as tobacco cessation.

Hypnosis used with chronic pain Veterans

“It’s an interaction between someone trained in hypnosis and a patient who is interested in using that focused attention to reach a goal,” she said. “We use it quite a bit with Veterans who have chronic pain.”

Overall, Whole Health is a different approach to care. It puts the patient at the center. It asks what’s important to them and shows Veterans an alternative to conventional methods of healing.

“The Veterans are the expert of what’s happening in their mind and body,” said Vair. “The goal is to make them feel empowered and equipped, rather than feeling like they don’t have a voice in their care.”

Army Veteran Donna Tibbetts, who has taken five different Whole Health classes, got off to a rocky start with the service.

Not a fan at first, then changed her mind

“I have to admit I was not a great fan of Whole Health in the beginning,” said Tibbetts. “Oh, heck no, there’s no way this is going to work. However, I have since changed my mind.”

Tibbetts said the biggest shock was that her Whole Health coach didn’t just give her the answers she was looking for. She was used to going to a doctor and being told what to do to get better.

“That’s not the way it works,” she said. “When you’re talking, they give your ideas back to you to fix yourself. It’s a totally different mindset. It will dawn on you slowly. It’s up to you to fix yourself.”

Tibbetts, who is nearing the end with her coach, has fond memories of her time in Whole Health. She said she knows that other Veterans would benefit from this service.

“Whole health coaches are really good.”

“I just hope this helps get other Veterans interested,” she said. “I’m telling you, it’s a lot of fun and Whole Health coaches are really good at what they do.”

At the Salisbury VA, Whole Health sees more midlife and older Veterans, but the pandemic – and the virtual modalities that followed – has allowed more young Veterans to participate.

“Younger Veterans are working or going to school,” said Vair. “They don’t have the ability to come from one of the 21 counties we serve, spend an hour in class, then drive back. But now we can meet them where they are. As a result, we are seeing more of them.”

Vair would like to see this trend continue and one of the most important steps it to ensure providers communicate facets of this program to their patients.

“We’ve been at this since 2018,” she said. “We have so many initiatives within VA that it can be an uphill battle to stand out. I don’t know if we’ll get to the point where every Veteran will hear about Whole Health at every visit, but that’s the goal we are working toward. Whole Health is for everyone.”

By Todd Goodman is a public affairs officer and Luke Thompson is a photographer, both at the Salisbury VA

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Published on Apr. 12, 2022

Estimated reading time is 4.3 min.

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48 Comments

  1. Rich Ridler May 8, 2022 at 6:44 pm

    I was a PA and had 32 yrs in Navy-FMF. After retirement I went to Clinical Hypnotherapy School and there are simply Amazing results thru several techniques depending on the problem. Great results with PTSD! Beats the hell out of the “just talk about it” and anything available! Good for the VA to Finally get on top of this.

  2. J. Stadig May 1, 2022 at 7:52 pm

    When I was on active duty I was in the medical field, as an LPN/EMT from 68 to 88, injured my back while with the 121 Hosp in Korea. I have got so frustrated with bean-counters determining who can and can’t receive care based on how many $ that treatment cost, or how many times they needed that particular treatment per day, week, or month!
    I think that the only personnel who should be determining the amount of treatments, or the frequencies they should be repeated is if they are determining the frequencies for their own family members, or, for themselves. The chances are, that they would be much more likely to find a more reasonable solution to how to treat a patient as a human being, and not a statistical analysis figure to be utilized to determine how to keep costs down.
    I was active duty, but we had our numbers used to decide how many people would have to be sacrificed to save tax dollars from our band-aid budget!!

  3. MIke Basehart April 30, 2022 at 8:01 pm

    My pcp agreed to acupuncture through Community Care but not Massage therapy. The VA has provided excellent care for me and recently approved my community Care ORTHO Doc to do shoulder surgery which was done successfully in March and all the follow up PT visits. Thank you!

  4. Sandra Hewitt April 28, 2022 at 6:55 pm

    Massage Therapy is also available for Veterans. I am a licensed Massage Therapist in Rice Lake Wisconsin contracted with the VA. The community care department has been very helpful to my VA clients getting paper work done for massage. My buisness name is Healingn Massage LLC. I’m located in the Point of Renewal building at 611 West Ave Rice Lake WI

  5. Lisa Wand April 28, 2022 at 9:49 am

    I am an acupuncturist that has been approved to provide care to veterans. Who do I talk with about process or the steps to have patients get additional treatments? I understand that the primary Dr asks for the initial set, but they run out quickly?

  6. Melissa Livingston April 28, 2022 at 9:09 am

    I had an acupuncturist that the VA would not bother to help their new biller. I lost her.

  7. Benny Reynolds April 27, 2022 at 11:06 pm

    I’ve been waiting for two months to get an appointment with a chiropractor for a neck issue that has already been approved, and when I call I am literally listening to elevator music all day waiting for someone to take my call to figure out how and who to make the approved appointment with. Oh and BTW, I have called for a week straight and still no one will pick up the phone. This is what you do. Make it sound good and then do this to us so we give up!!!!!

    • jerry April 28, 2022 at 9:28 am

      MY experience. Last year involved in a car accident suffering a neck injury . I asked my PCP about a Chiopractor and was informed that
      I needed to do 2 other modalities first so I chose physical therapy and battlefield acupuncture. After 3 months of that was given authorization for Chiopractor
      of which I was authorized 12 visits th n extended for an additional 12at rec of the Chiopractor. Once I got the authorization had no problem finding a Chiopractor to provide the service .
      I have no complaints with my care at the VA

    • Thomas (Toby) A. Weir April 28, 2022 at 3:25 pm

      It seems that no one remains at their desk to answer their phones at the VAMC here in Manchester, NH! You call and get voicemail. The message says that they will return your call. THEY seldom do! Yet the claim is: “ WE take care of OUR Veterans! BS!

  8. DRMorris April 27, 2022 at 10:58 pm

    Makes for a nice link in a newsletter , but when 9 out 10 vets that want /desire/need the services and are told “No.” , maybe the article shouldn’t try to make this sound so successful. Just from the few comments, and my own experience, I’d say this is a huge FAIL.

  9. Erin Tafoya April 27, 2022 at 10:04 pm

    This article touts the benefits of these therapies but does not give the information to veterans on how to access these treatments.

    • Stoney April 28, 2022 at 12:31 pm

      I agree, the VA loves to dangle that carrot just to snatch it away.

    • Sandra Hewitt April 28, 2022 at 7:01 pm

      You need a referal from your Primary VA Dr first then your community care gets involved VA arranges appointments. Process takes about 2weeks

    • Glory May 2, 2022 at 1:34 pm

      Agree there’s the carrot… how do I grab the carrot to eat if it???‍♀️

  10. Ricahrd April 27, 2022 at 9:56 pm

    I was severely reprimanded back in the 90’s for not compiling with the VA pain management drug protocols. I had 5 different pain prescriptions and was informed that this was all that could be done for my chronic pain. I refused to comply and was left to my own education and resources to help begin my healing process. Working with the body, not drugging it into more disempowerment and suicidal ideation was not the answer. I am grateful the V.A. has realized the horrific fall-out from these directives of “pill them to death.” Anyone should question these drug protocols before it is too late – it is your body and trusting your inner wisdom is paramount. The VA Whole Health program works. Get educated in the many healing modalities offer with Whole Health. You can begin your journey into healing, wellness and mindfulness.
    My sincere condolences to Jengi Miller and the lost of her husband to suicide. Peace be with you and your family.

  11. David N. Shadd April 27, 2022 at 9:55 pm

    The medical care I have received from the VA has been very good; I am so happy with the care and compassion shown by every staff member. Thank you. I also receive non-traditional whole care that I pay for. The medical point of view is vital but is not everything. I’ve been greatly helped by supplements, vitamins, non-traditional and Chiropractic care. I accept the best of both worlds and I am doing very well with this balanced approach. I believe it is the the future of medicine. I am very glad to see the VA embracing it.

    That said, I must warn against hypnotism. It works by fixing one’s attention to get under the awareness and overtly control the subject. Whatever effectiveness that occurs with hypnotism, and it can be very therapeutic, is undercut by its very nature. The subject is not a true participant. The hypnotist by-passes the subject’s control and will very often inadvertently stimulate dormant charged areas. The brain surgeon will keep the subject awake and aware so he is guided with this feedback and can so avoid doing more damage than good. What is needed is a therapy that increases the ability to confront, expand awareness and so discharge problems as a stronger being.

  12. Daniel Rodriguez April 27, 2022 at 9:45 pm

    My wife is an amazing massage therapist. She tried to give her contact information to the VA to offer free massage to Vets. They denied her. The VA is an -ss backwards system. If it doesn’t involve long lines and pills they don’t want to bother with it.

    • Sandra Hewitt LMT WI # 10278 May 3, 2022 at 11:16 am

      Optus Health Credentialing physical health
      11030 Optus Circle, Eden Prairie MN 55344
      Fax 1-888-272-1724
      MPS 1-800-873-4575
      It is a long frustrating process but hang in there.

      • Sandra Hewitt LMT WI # 10278 May 3, 2022 at 11:19 am

        Spell error should be Optum Health

  13. Aurora April 27, 2022 at 9:44 pm

    I would love to be able to get acupuncture for my back which is a rated disability. How can I go about this?

    • Sandra Hewitt LMT WI # 10278 May 3, 2022 at 11:10 am

      Your VA local office can get you info for a Acupuncturist contracted with VA. I am a contracted VA Massage Therapist in Northern WI working with a VA contracted Acupuncturist. Chiropractic is also available to you .
      Your next step is to get a referal from your VA primary. You will need separate referal and paper work for each service.

  14. Erin MItchell April 27, 2022 at 9:38 pm

    This is a great idea! That is all it is for the VA! The VA is good at putting out these articles to make them look good but yet have fallen horribly short in any actual treatment that works for us Veterans!
    I am one of those veterans that was forced on to 35+ medications many that I combination could have killed me and to the point that they issued my mother a Narcan nasal spray and when she asked why? The pharmacist told her “due to the combination of medications your daughter takes you need to have this in case she over doses”! This scared my mother to the point that we had an appointment with my PCP for her to clarify this order and to explain why I was put on these medications in the first place. My mother and I were then given some BS excuse and no justification as to why I was put on these toxic doses of medications other than “they are given to her to help her”! It was a 9 year nightmare that ended with being treated like I was some junkie off the street when I provided refused to follow the taper plan she had agreed to and signed and I detoxed myself which was another 2 months of nightmares!

    I have been told many times I could have only so many treatments that NEVER lined up with researched treatment time frames! This does not help any veteran and if the VA truly wants to help and treat the Veterans with proven and effective continuity of treatment for these “outside the box” treatments they need to stop listening to some higher up behind a desk that has no clue what treatmentsr really work and how many are needed!!

  15. Anna S April 27, 2022 at 9:13 pm

    It is nice to know that I am not the only one that has sought chiropractic services and have Politely in so many words not available for Tricare.
    I have asked my local VA for chiropractic and was informed will refer to physical therapy and they can determine if I would need chiropractic services and if I want chiropractic services just to let them know.
    Hopefully sometime in the near furure!!

  16. Anastasia Schmoll April 27, 2022 at 8:47 pm

    It’s a lot of lip service. I had 12 acupuncture appointments but they were issued in Aug so they expired in Dec. I was not eligible for Accupunture again until Aug the following year even though I didn’t use my 12 appointments! The system is broken. I’m in dire need and too bad is the answer. It’s a bunch of great ideas with horrible application. I can’t get pain relief so let me Resort to street drugs because the VA is worried about Opiod abuse but God forbid they should approve the one thing that works for me and that’s Accupunture.

    • Derek D April 28, 2022 at 9:24 pm

      See if your acupuncturist will bill them out in the window of time you have to use them, then spread the actual treatments out over a longer time period. I don’t know that there’s anything dishonest about that if 12 are approved and 12 are billed. None of this was even available when I injured my back. But I was lucky to be able to afford to get acupuncture on my own dime and it is literally magic. Cures pain and anxiety and puts you in tune with your own body. It really is a shame the amount of bureaucracy you have to navigate just for some proper relief. I wish you the best, and please avoid the street drugs.

  17. Erin MItchell April 27, 2022 at 8:42 pm

    The concept of whole health care is amazing and works BUT the ridiculous limitations and restrictions the VA puts us Veterans under making it almost impossible to get continuity of care and treatments at intervals that actually are therapeutic and make a difference makes it so 95% of the veterans I know in our community just give up! You can only be told NO so many times about your health care before you just give up and stop trying to cut the red tape and conform to what the VA healthcare system tells you is needed and the norm. Being a Veteran who did this so I would quit getting yelled at and scolded by my PCP about my health and well-being became passive and did what I was told only to be put on 35+ medications making me a
    Zombie and ultimately resulting in me being put on high amounts of OxyContin and Oxycodone and other harmful medications I was told to take by a VA Physician and a 9 year nightmare! That is no quality of life! If the VA is really wanting to truly care for Veterans they need to realize and understand therapeutic treatment durations and not go by what some higher up behind a desk say they should be!!!
    I have fought for acupuncture and finally got it and just like the other veterans on this post have said I was told 1 appointment a month maybe 2 and after the first round I would have to wait til the next year to get them again due to the policies and regulations set forth and I should be grateful to even get these! Then finding out that my Doctor of acupuncture had NEVER been paid for 90% of her veterans visits! How embarrassing for me! This provider cares and wants to help the veterans population and she does provide services only to be stiffed by the VA!
    There are many facets to this “Whole Health Care” is a great idea but ONLY IF the VA researches and understands treatment durations that are needed and that NO VETERAN IS THE SAME AND NO TREATMENT PLAN CAN BE COOLIE CUTTER!!

  18. Hans DEGNER April 27, 2022 at 8:38 pm

    How do I get into the Tai Chi and Chiropratic part of Whole Health? I have received Accupuncture in the past and I love it…just not enough session authorized per year. I’m in San Diego

  19. Chuck Pullen April 27, 2022 at 7:26 pm

    Every time I get authorized visits to a Community Care Chiropractor, it’s wonderful. Then when the number of visits runs out, there is a lapse of 2 months or more for another authorization. It’s VERY CUMBERSOME to get ongoing care.

  20. MYRA BROWN April 27, 2022 at 7:24 pm

    I AM A VETERAN IN WISC, WHO USES MY LOCAL VA. THIS WINTER I WAS IN NEED OF COUNCELING DUE TO MEDICAL AN FAMILY LOSS. THINGS FELT LIKE THEY HAD PILED UP ON ME. SO MY VA OFFERED MEDITATION AN HYPNOSIS WHICH I WAS EXCITED ABOUT. THEN THEY TELL ME THE MEDITATION IS A GROUP SESSION ONLINE AN AS IT TURNS OUT, OUT OF TWO HRS THERES ABOUT A TEN MINUTE SESSION OF RELAXATION AN DEEP BREATING AFTER GROUP CONVERSATION. ( THATS NOT MEDITATION, WHICH CAN BE SO MUCH MORE PROFOUND IN HEALING ). THEN I LEARN THE HYPNOSIS SESSION IS A POSITIVE WORD REINFORCEMENT — NOT MEDITATION — ( WHICH AGAIN IS SO MUCH MORE PROFOUND IN THE HEALING PROCESS ). I HAVE NEVER EXPERIENCED SUCH DARKNESS IN MY HEART AN MIND. I COULDNT UNDERSTAND WHAT WAS GOING ON AN WHY ? I CRIED FOR DAYS AFTERWARD. I WANTED TO DIE BUT I DONT BELIEVE IN SUICIDE BECAUSE I AM A SPIRITUAL PERSON. BUT IT WAS A VERY DARK TIME. I DECIDED TO DO THIS ON MY OWN. I FOUND A PLACE TO GO AN LEARN ON MY OWN. HOHZO HEALING IN GREEN BAY SAVED ME. IM NOW STARTING TO SEE COLORS IN MY MINDS EYE AN FEEL VERY UPLIFTED AN GRATEFUL. THERES MORE TO THIS STORY BUT BOTTOM LINE I HAV BEEN VRY DISSAPOINTED BY MY VA. I HAV HAD AT LEAST SEVEN OR EIGHT PCP IN TEN YRS. IM A HEART PT. ITS VERY HARD TO KEEP A DR WHO IS AWARE OF YOUR IMPORTANT MEDICAL ISSUES WHEN TURNOVER IS SO HIGH. I THINK WE DESERVE BETTER. IF THEY CANT KEEP DRS THEN GIVE ME COMMUNITY CARE PERMENANTLY. IM ANGRY AN TIRED OF THIS NONSENSE. BE BLESSED

  21. Johnny aTharp April 27, 2022 at 7:07 pm

    I would like to be included in the Whole Health program? I would like to be considered for acupuncture treatment! I have constant back problems!

  22. Charles G Phillips April 27, 2022 at 7:06 pm

    Like many others commenting, I have “straight-up” asked for any of these alternatives and been told “the New Mexico VA does not currently offer that”. I moved here from the Amarillo Texas VA Healthcare System–which was great, received good care for 20 years–and the NM VA’s first and only action was to immediately stop the pain medications I had been on for years to treat severe chronic pain. Anyone who’s been forced to go through withdrawal knows it’s not only agonizing but for a 72-year-old disabled Viet vet it’s downright dangerous. After 2 years of disinterest and poor service, I have simply stopped using the VA for my healthcare–I now go to a private physician and bear the incurred expenses myself.

    So don’t tell us that the VA gives a damn. Not all states have competent VA systems.

  23. Mike Cox April 27, 2022 at 6:58 pm

    Someone needs to tell the fcking garbage -ss VA providers at these small shthole local VA clinics that these treatments are authorized. I had to drop a congressional to get my provider to authorize chiropractic and like another commentator only eight visits every six months. My chiropractor found the reason for my back and treatment was going great…. for two and half weeks because my eight visits only lasted that long. Now I’m waiting for more treatments to be authorized and basically start over again. How about the VA fires the dinosaur providers that HATE veterans and let us figure out our own community care.

  24. Luther Johnson April 26, 2022 at 11:12 pm

    I’m at the Phoenix VA. I do acupuncture through community care. I get 8 treatment s
    after that I have to wait 180 days till another 8 treatments. Too far in between
    treatments. Is that VA policy??

    • Mike Cox April 27, 2022 at 7:01 pm

      Luther I have been told that is the policy. I also made the lazy bastards authorize more than that, now I am waiting to see my chiro doc again, might end up being 180 days

  25. Geri Poncia April 20, 2022 at 9:00 am

    HOW DOES ONE GET CHIROPRACTIC CARE? I have straight up requested it…nope, was told Columbia VA doesn’t have a DO and my PCP will not authorize community care for chiropractic. She suggested I take twice as much Aleve as recommended. This Whole Health concept HAS FAILED here…

    • Mike Cox April 27, 2022 at 7:02 pm

      Geri I had to drop a congressional on my local VA to get the ball rolling. Don’t give up it’s worth it

    • Kenneth April 28, 2022 at 5:49 am

      I go to Columbia Dorn VA as well and asked about it and was told you have to go to physical therapy and jump through all kinds of hoops basically before they will authorize a chiropractor. I have noticed a lot of the things on the updates for what the VA i8s doing and what is available either has a lot of things you have to do to get it or it isn’t available at Columbia, SC.

  26. P. Renz April 19, 2022 at 6:09 pm

    I find massage therapy is extremely helpful for getting me back on my feet but it’s no longer affordable so I’m bedridden. Taking a shower is so painful I avoid it for weeks or months and our tiny house doesn’t have a bathtub. I have a crushed L5 Vertebrae, narrowed foraminals at L5, L4, L3, slipped bulging disc at L5. How do I know if my VA covers this particular treatment? If I could get massage going again I might be able to do yoga.

  27. Harold Rawles April 18, 2022 at 5:43 pm

    I would like to try this, what do I need to do to sign up?

  28. Jengi Miller April 18, 2022 at 8:43 am

    I’m beyond happy to see this Whole Health movement gaining traction and being validated! I know it is still not widely accepted (nor financially covered it seems from the comments), but I have hope that it will change the mindset of those veterans struggling with physical and mental pain.

    The VA has pushed drugs at every problem (as has the general medical community) for so long that it’s great to see a different approach being given some validity, especially an approach that puts the power to get better back in the patient’s hands if they are open to it.

    Unfortunately, my husband was not open to trying non-traditional means of coping with his pain or PTSD and his “therapy” mainly consisted of constant drug changes with no real improvement after the first three months of therapy. He suffered for 7 years with PTSD and chronic pain before succumbing to his despair and taking his life.

    I TRULY believe many of these alternative treatments along with cognitive behavioral therapy and only initial stabilizing medication is the key to regaining a life for the majority of veterans. May this Whole Health program continue to expand to reach everyone!!

  29. Chris Shand April 17, 2022 at 11:04 am

    NJ VA only permits acupuncture for lower back pain and only after going thru the pain clinic and exhausting that first. I’ve seen first hand the amazing things that can be accomplished with acupuncture from anxiety, PTSD and addiction management to regaining mobility after an immobilizing stroke. It’s a shame there is such a limited use of the consults and such a long wait. It really needs to be opened up as modality of choice for a whole host of ailments and eliminate or reduce medications entirely.

    • Brad L April 28, 2022 at 10:30 am

      I’m in NJ and I have done accupuncture for multiple injuries, although I only had 12 visits and there was a gap but did get more. I did that through physical medicine, not primary care or physical therapy. I have an open referral to PM for my back, neck, shoulders, knees, migraines, arms, sciatica, etc.

      I think a big piece of this community based thing is funding. I was told the last POTUS allotted funding for community care but once that pot of funds was exhausted it had to be re-voted on and hasn’t been since or hasn’t had as much funding, one or the other. If we have funding (which we should), then they’re pretty good about sending outside the VA for care. I’ve also done Physical Therapy outside the VA, during the last administration, but am now going to PT at the VA for my neck as I was told outside wasn’t an option now. I have been fairly impressed with the staff at the PT clinic so far though so I’m hopeful they’ll get my neck fixed up.

  30. Hilda Wade April 16, 2022 at 6:44 am

    I am very interested in Holistic approaches. Where can I go for training/services?

  31. Rachel April 15, 2022 at 10:18 am

    While I am pleased to read there is acknowledgement that the above services can provide subjective benefit, as of 2020, Tricare exclusions include acupuncture, dry needling, Chiropractic services, Massage Therapy, e-stim, and vestibular therapy…just to name a few. I have reached out to ask them what research they are using to justify no longer reimbursing for these services. The website simply states: “Disclaimer:
    This list of covered services is not all inclusive. TRICARE covers services that are medically necessary. To be medically necessary means it is appropriate, reasonable, and adequate for your condition. and considered proven. There are special rules or limits on certain services, and some services are excluded.”
    https://www.tricare.mil/CoveredServices/IsItCovered/Exclusions
    As a practicing clinician with the military, I am surprised at the lack of conversations about these exclusions.

    • Brad L April 28, 2022 at 10:33 am

      Tricare isn’t the VA though. I know you know this, but just saying that the VA has covered these things for me in the past. With the VA, try getting a referral to physical medicine from your primary care and asking PM provider about these options.

  32. Anthony Fortescue April 15, 2022 at 6:38 am

    How do I request whole health (yoga, hypnotherapy, etc.) through the VA? Thank you.

    • Jeffrey Kinderdietz April 19, 2022 at 8:57 am

      You can request these services through your primary care provider. You can also ask at your medical center for the Clinical Director or Program Manager of Whole Health and they should be able to assist.

  33. gene Schafer April 13, 2022 at 4:19 pm

    Does any of this help for the horrific suicide rate of the vets. So many need help. They came home but never left the war zone.

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